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jlwelding

Oil Truns Black Quick

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I changed the oil in my 05 and in one day it was just as black as it was before I changed it. Thinking of running for a few days and drain again. Before I add Amsoil.I run Amsoil in my 01 and it stays clean for about4-5k before turning black. Why would the oil in the 05 turn black so fast?

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Yep as stated above it's just the nature of the CR beast. thats the price we pay for wanting them to run and idle quieter.:)Don't worry about it and don't waste any money trying to flush it. It will be black again after a few hundred to a thousand miles again anyhow.It just makes it easier to see on the dipstick.:lmao:

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No different that my 2nd Gen 24V... It nearly black in a few hundred miles... There is a tiny of black after a change but still transparent. Color of the oil is meaningless... Think about it Caj was running 20K miles between oil changes all the way to 1 million... But changed at some point got worried. But even here locally I've heard several Cummins owners changing oil at 15K to 20K miles with standard petroluem based oils... Each his own... :shrug:

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Just have to get used to it, my 2nd gen used motor with 200k and run on dino oil it cleared right up with the Amsoil, you can read the dip stick through it at 3k on oil change.I wonder what makes Amsiol stay clean so long? :shrug:I understand it makes no diff. as far as color go just weird.

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As it has been stated its normal. I have a bypass and even with the Amsoil flush two changes ago its black as soon as I check the level after changing it. It's all soot from the way Cummins met emissions. The cam, turbo, timing, and pistons all play into it. I have changed everything but deleting the 3rd event (but its advanced) and pistons and mine still does it. I'm not even sure it would stay clean with a centrifuge.

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I'm not even sure it would stay clean with a centrifuge.

I'd have to agree here. The viscosity of the oil would be too much for the smallest (some say sub-micronic) soot particles to work thru even in a centrifuge. Not enough mass to the particle.:smart: My MotorGuard TP bypass is effective in keeping the oil "analytically clean"; but it's sure black as..........."insert your own colorful metaphor"!!!!!:doh::lmao:
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I'd have to agree here. The viscosity of the oil would be too much for the smallest (some say sub-micronic) soot particles to work thru even in a centrifuge. Not enough mass to the particle.:smart: My MotorGuard TP bypass is effective in keeping the oil "analytically clean"; but it's sure black as..........."insert your own colorful metaphor"!!!!!:doh::lmao:

Following you with Frantz and doing just find...

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I change mine at 25K and the Blackstone report always comes back that I could go longer if I wanted :cool: . I changed the oil in both of my Daughters cars over this weekend, the Volvo had 7,500 miles on the oil and the Buick had 5,000 miles and both run Mobil 1 5W30 and the oil was black as coal.Color really does not mean a hill of beans, except for crocked service people to make extra money for expensive flush treatments. :rolleyes: Don

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every time i have had my oil changed by someone else they bring out your oil is black and you need a flush. i just tell them their oil will be black in 500 miles, do i get a free oil change if their's is black after the flush? that crap pisses me off.

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every time i have had my oil changed by someone else they bring out your oil is black and you need a flush. i just tell them their oil will be black in 500 miles, do i get a free oil change if their's is black after the flush? that crap pisses me off.

Nature of the beast... :rolleyes:

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Nature of the beast... :rolleyes:

i dont get pissed off out loud at them. they are in a service buisness and they make money by selling services. it pisses me off more when they do that to my wife. sent her in for an oil change once and it cost me $250 by the time they got thru selling her services.

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Isn't this just the carbon that passes by the rings and enters the oil? I believe it's the detergent in the oil that allows it to float in the oil instead of building than building up somewhere in the engine. In other words, I believe it's working as designed. Mine turns black the moment I crank it up. I usually run a quart through to flush out anything in the bottom of the pan as well. Just makes me feel better though doesn't really do a darn thing. lol

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Yes it is, and some engines do it worse than others. 04 was the last year for 100% stock engines to have visually clean oil. Modern oil is both detergent and has additives to suspend soot. This is a double-edged sword, you don't get soot agglomerating and causing wear, but you also have a very hard time filtering it due to its suspended size. A centrifuge is really the only way to remove all or near all of the soot.

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You know.. a centrifuge.. ;) Make the oil dizzy till it coughs up soot.

[h=3]cen·tri·fuge/ˈsentrəˌfyo͞oj/[/h]Verb: Subject to the action of a centrifuge.

Noun: A machine with a rapidly rotating container that applies centrifugal force to its contents, typically to separate fluids of different densities or liquids from solids.

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Explain in layman :lol: please

A soot particle is sub-micron in size. The best conventional bypass filter on the market is 2um absolute, and about 39% efficient at catching soot. Which still catches a bunch, even the full flow at 15-35um catches soot. But not at the rate in which its collected.

A centrifuge spins the oil and all the contaminates are slung and trapped, while clean oil is returned to the sump. They are not cheap, difficult to mount, and honestly not really needed.. even a bypass isn't needed, but it's easy and effective.

You know.. a centrifuge.. ;) Make the oil dizzy till it coughs up soot.

:lmao2::lmao2::lmao2:

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The cam on the cr motors closes the exhaust early for emissions reasons. This is not the case as much with your 01. If you want cleaner oil you will need a new cam. That is my next upgrade on my 05!

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In your opinion what is the best stock filter. I have used eao80 for 4 years and I thought they where pretty good.

EaO80 or Donaldson ELF7349, same filter but the Donaldson is cheaper... There is nothing better.

The cam on the cr motors closes the exhaust early for emissions reasons. This is not the case as much with your 01. If you want cleaner oil you will need a new cam. That is my next upgrade on my 05!

It will help with the UOA, but my oil is still just as black 15K miles after my cam. I was hoping it would clean up, but I think the pistons still contribute too much to the soot loading. I am very happy with my cam thou! I am glad I didn't go bigger as I would have had to do something different with the exhaust brake, I lowered my rpms for 60 psi by 500!

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My 01 uses stratopore filters. They have lasted a million miles and the cylinders still have crosshatching. How can there be better filters? Maybe some are just as good, but better?

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My 01 uses stratopore filters. They have lasted a million miles and the cylinders still have crosshatching. How can there be better filters? Maybe some are just as good, but better?

Stratapore are great fitlers, don't get me wrong. But they are absolute at 25um, the Donaldson/Amsoil are absolute at 15um, that's better. Is it needed? Probably not for most, but they are about the same cost and better filtration is better regardless.

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