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jttrucker

Extreme cold!!!

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Hey guys, Ive got a question about my 01 dodge concerning my heater. I live in Big Piney Wyoming (Icebox of the nation) no kidding, we have the coldest on average temps anywhere in the US. We see sub sub zero temps here and while traveling for work as a pipeliner I get into N. Dakota as well. My 01 is probably like everyone elses, it does not like to warm up in these extreme conditions. Everything works fine, thermostat, blend door, core ect. and I also use a winter front. Have any of you used a 12v heater or another alternative to help you stay warm in your 2nd gen? Any ideas. My heated seats help lol but while my backside is warm my hands are freezing lol. I cant drive and sit on my hands LOL. Any ideas? Im open, Thanks

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There are companies that make engine "blankets". These essentially isolate the engine compartment from the outside air. Sorry, no info though.

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My 05 is a bit slow to warm up and the only time I have been cold in the cab is once it dips to -15 or colder it won't build enough heat even with the front blocked off totally to get much more than luke warm air from the vents. My 02 was always a quick warm up and always toasty in the cab.By the way reading your signature you need to ditch all the K&N filters ASAP.

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I'm just east of you in western Nebraska and we usually get national news for lows since we sit in a bowl. Anyways, I use a magnetic heater that sticks to the oil pan and the block heater. I run them on a timer set for 1.5 hours before work and only idle my truck for less than 5 minutes (kicks into high idle after 30 seconds). I have always wanted to try one of those ceramic heaters that plug into the aux outlet.

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I just binged ( not googled ) "truck cab heater" and all kinds of things came up. I'm sure some one that lives in cold country has experience with them. Here in San Diego by the coast, if it gets to 42 we think it's a 3 dog night.:lol:

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Speaking of winter fronts, what is a good brand or company to get one from? We moved to North Dakota this summer and I am getting ready for the colder winters up here..

The free ones...........a piece of cardbard directly in front of the radiator/coolers behind the grill with a 6 inch square hole cut in the fan clutch area. http://www.genosgarage.com/DODGE-RAM-WINTER-GRILL-COVER-94-02/productinfo/WINTER_FR_9402/Genos sells a really good weather fronts as well

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The free ones...........a piece of cardbard directly in front of the radiator/coolers behind the grill with a 6 inch square hole cut in the fan clutch area.

I ran one for a few years and then didn't. Guess what? I didn't see any difference in the temp gauge or the heat output.

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I ran one for a few years and then didn't. Guess what? I didn't see any difference in the temp gauge or the heat output.

Which one did you run, cardboardor the full front winter front like genos sells? I know the ones you snap into the front grill and bumper are worthless but i have had good luck with the card board right against the front rad/coolers with a small hole for the fan clutch and it works qite well for mine, just need to make it big enough to cover the whole rad /cooler surface.

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It gets pretty cold here and I do the cardboard trick in between the air cooler and the rad. I haven't proven whether it helps or not I just do it ! I want to try a 4th gen thermostat this winter.

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Which one did you run, cardboardor the full front winter front like genos sells? I know the ones you snap into the front grill and bumper are worthless but i have had good luck with the card board right against the front rad/coolers with a small hole for the fan clutch and it works qite well for mine, just need to make it big enough to cover the whole rad /cooler surface.

The cardboard one. There was probably a hole in the center that was about 8 inches in diameter (been a few years, trying to recall). All I know is my truck just doesn't seem to notice if it is there or not.

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It gets pretty cold here and I do the cardboard trick in between the air cooler and the rad. I haven't proven whether it helps or not I just do it ! I want to try a 4th gen thermostat this winter.

That's a tough thermostat to get up here in Idaho no one even stocks the 200*F 6.7L thermostat. I'll just have to custom order it I guess.

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So based on experience or thought or whatever you have, is it better to run the cardboard in between the intercooler and radiator or in front of both coolers? I would assume in front of both coolers because it would get that IAT up a bit, but I could be totally wrong too.

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Personally I don't like the cardboard in front of the coolers or in-between. I've actually seen so seriously high engine coolant temps with cardboard in either setup but winter front on the grill there is just enough cold air in the lower bumper to keep things controlled on mild days.

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In Grand Forks it will hit zero and below and will not be above zero for weeks on end, and unless he is towing heavy blocked off solid will hurt nothing just normal everyday driving but the trick is to open up the center section, if doing a ton of town driving with an auto and it is getting warm then move the cardboard in between the coolers and rad.I have had the grill inserts in all 4 of my rams and they are worth less to say the least in sub zero temps.He is not too far from International Falls Minnesota "200 miles maybe"which is the coldest town on record in the lower 48 in winter.

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Hmmm. That's the trick I guess the fact you can keep constant low temps in the minuses. Where driving down into the canyon you rise in temperature into the positive 30's and get up to New Meadows Valley it could be a minus temp so I've got to work with variable temps over terrain.

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I don't think there is actually a fix to this other than an EGR.. I think dorkweed is the closest to a solution. Radiators do nothing until the engine is up to temp. I have completely blocked mine off and ran 2 identical tests on 2 identical 10F days and there was 0 difference between completely blocked off and completely wide open as far as how long it took to get to operating temps. I have a digital water temp gauge so I can see exact temps. I stopwatched it....the times are identical. The radiator does nothing if the engine doesn't have a reason to use it. I don't run a thing at this point. I challenge anyone to do the exact same 2 identical tests before challenging that.. Insulating the engine would be a good thing, but I think another big part of the problem is air touching the inside of the engine. By that I mean the incoming air.. The intercooler easily takes any heated air (from turbo compression) back down to ambient temps, meaning the engine is sucking in that 0F or below air. The intake manifold is completely aluminum and probably absorbs a lot of the engine blocks heat and the constant flow of freezing air keeps the manifold/engine cooled. In a sense, the incoming air and everything it touches, act as the engines "radiator". I bet the oil pan being open to outside air also aids in cooling things, but I've never measured oil temps in the winter compared to summer. At 10F going 50mph, I drove for 35 miles and it just got to 170F and never got any higher, with the heater on full blast. The thermostat never opened and the 10F radiator temps from the IR gun when I pulled in the driveway reinforced that. The heater core was taking away all the excess heat. Radiator didn't play a factor.. To me, since the radiator doesn't do anything until its up to operating temps, I would block the intercooler if anything. However, you barely build any boost just cruising down the highway so the air isn't getting very hot so you can't try and retain heat that isn't being built. Hence, the EGR.... Pieces of crap but they take the hot exhaust heat and run it back through the engine, warming it up. I see that as the only solution that would actually help matters. :2cents:

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Don't forget the parasitic heat loss as the thermostat has a vent hole in it so it circulates a small amount of coolant 100% of the time even if it is closed.You did hit a big one with engine blanket but you would need to insulate the oil pan as that is where most of the heat goes via wind chill factors.I have driven 65 mph in -20* and colder temps and the temp gauge never went past 150* if that a few times in my 05 with auto with front totally blocked off, in this case the parasitic loss from the cold wind chills blowing past the engine and oil pan sucked a lot of generated heat. These are trips where the insulated gloves stay on all the way home as the cab never warms up.

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I've always been told NOT to block the radiator or the front in that manner because of airflow restrictions. That's why I've got a winterfront on the grill to allow air still. I suppose just not air directly at the radiator/inter-cooler. Then again, I'm not in such cold areas as you other guys' are.As well, it would probably be more work than its worth, but you could always look into making a shroud for your exhaust manifold and have the air filter draw its air from this and then in the summer have a bypass of some sort. :2cents:

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Don't forget the parasitic heat loss as the thermostat has a vent hole in it so it circulates a small amount of coolant 100% of the time even if it is closed. You did hit a big one with engine blanket but you would need to insulate the oil pan as that is where most of the heat goes via wind chill factors. I have driven 65 mph in -20* and colder temps and the temp gauge never went past 150* if that a few times in my 05 with auto with front totally blocked off, in this case the parasitic loss from the cold wind chills blowing past the engine and oil pan sucked a lot of generated heat. These are trips where the insulated gloves stay on all the way home as the cab never warms up.

Yeah I mentioned the oil pan lol. I want to see oil temp readings in the summer vs winter to back this up though. I mean the oil pan isn't aluminum so I'm not sure just how big of an effect 8 or so inches by maybe 5 inches of cold steel has on the oil. Steel doesn't exactly transfer heat that good so to me it's kind of a crapshoot to say if it plays a big factor or not until I see some oil temp readings. Ideally a gasser is the only thing to have in the winter from what I can tell. They put a lot more heat into the coolant due to inefficiencies. Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm is it possible to run the espar unit while driving? I mean with a gasser you are paying for the heat by using more fuel than a diesel truck, so if you used more fuel (in the espar) you would have the same effect of getting more heat.

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RyanThe title of this thread is "Extreme Cold" which to me means 0 and below.If you have not experienced it before it is not easy to describe.Anything above 0 is not even a remote comparison to how iron and metal and heat acts in sub zero, the sub zero temps isn't the only thing to consider, add 20-40 mph winds on top of sub zero temps and it is a whole new game changer it sucks any heat out of things almost as fast as it can be generated.You are more than welcome to come on up and do all the testing you want if you are willing to stand out in these conditions and do it........I lived my life out of a service truck working on all types of equipment for about 10 years and a lot of it in zub zero temps and windchills, so I can say it with confidence.

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Well I guess I have some experimenting to do. The only problem I have is its only about 5 miles to work one way. I know its really not good on the motor because it never gets a chance to fully warm up anyway. I want to try and help it any way I can.

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