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fossum99

AirDog help in subzero temps

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up here in ND now and we just got super cold weather and now I got number 1 in its been -15 for the past 3 days now and I have a problems of jelling up. I know the tank isn't Jelling up anymore it just when I go driving around I start to jell up and I think it comes from where the airdog is mounted and not getting any heat. I was wondering if anyone else has had this problem with Filters to cold.

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Even up here in Idaho I've been close to the minus numbers for the week and because of my location of the filters I'm much more immune to the gelling problem. Sad thing is short bed brackets are no longer sold.

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yes I am using anti-gel im using howes right now and number 1 fuel. I like that set up mopar1973man. I found this online and was going to try it. here is the website http://utahbiodieselsupply.com/fuelfilterheater.php I think this will clear my problem right up but wanted to ask you guys if this would be the thing to do. or make a box to go around the filter to keep a lot of the wind off the filters

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I am having the same problem with my raptor. Not quite gelling but it's bringing the pressure down. I just turned the regulator up and it's been ok. This cold does weird things to trucks. Where at in ND are you located fossum?

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Mike, i have learned from my veggie therm fuel heater experiment that my fuel temper never rose, so i would think that those heaters wouldn't cause to much trouble when your looking at the fuel flow rate, besides if they put it on the first filter you got to remember that 70% goes back to the tank for heat.

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yeah im going to buy one here tomorrow. Ilikeoldfords I live over here in the Bismarck/Mandan area. lucky I still have my Pontiac to drive around in since the truck is still down. getting it in a heated shop tomorrow night then changing fuel and water separator in the morning. diesel place around town said to try that and if that don't work they think it could be something else not working right.

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Oh ok. We have been seeing a high of -5 in the daytime here in grand forks. The station I usually fill up at I never have any problems with as their fuel is blended for -30*. My last tank I filled down in Fargo and I'm having a little trouble with it. Trying to get it out of the truck and fill up here again.

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I have only ever gelled once, thanks to B20. I run Amsoil Diesel Concentrate with Cold Flow Improver in the winter, IF I suspect the fuel isn't winterized. I did add a 2nd heater, the Fleetguard and OEM heater are both 300w elements. If the fuel is gelling in the filter, it's probably gelling in the tank but the tank isn't effected because it doesn't have a filter fine enough to catch the gelled particles. If the fuel is properly winterized a heater shouldn't be needed, but I still like having them.

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To try and push the gel thru the filter? Seems like a good way to hurt the pump.

I meant after I get the fuel all heated up and change fuel filter if there was a way to turn up the pump pressure. sorry for the miss under standing

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Does mixing 2 cycle oil in the fuel help stop gelling? Thought I read that somewhere. :shrug:

Michael has never had gelling issues with his, but I don't think that is from the 2 stroke. The 2 stroke doesn't have anything in it that would effect he parafins. His fuel is properly winterized from the pump since I don't believe he uses anything else in it.
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Fine line... There is a theory I work with but still have no proof of it. The fact the 2 cycle oil for snowmobiles is typically got a pour point to -50*F which also has a enhanced PPD (pour point depressant added) this is so oil injection system don't gell up in a snowmobile. So now if you mix -50*F pour point 2 cycle oil and -20*F pour point diesel would you expect a change in pour point? Kind of like knowing that fresh water freezes at +32*F but mix in a unknown solution of salt water and the freeze point is reduced. The only time this is not true is Synthetic 2 cycle oils since none of them have any parafin wax so they have no need for PPD to be used. So I can say that 2 cycle oil WILL NOT cause gelling issues but it might help in keeping it flowing.What really neat is the PPD that used in diesel is the same PPD used in some 2 cycle oils (petroleum).

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I had some diesel in a liter bottle after messing with my airgod last week, this morning i looked at it and it was cloudy looking like it's jelling up. But I know it's summer fuel last time i filed up was almost 2 months ago. it was about 0 this morning, glad I got a car to drive.

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I wonder how I could wire those heaters up so that they are on a timer. Just realized they are 12 volt so they would run off the truck battery. Would only want to run them for a couple hours in the morning

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If the fuel we are getting is going to be problematic, I'm going to look into what Arctic Fox has, for at least one of my diesel tractors.

They have kits for running hot coolant in a loop that parallels the draw straw, line kits that have an internal 12 volt heater running the length of the hose (looks like a heat tape that runs down the center of a 5/8ths rubber hose). Filter head for fuel filter that has hot coolant flowing around a 12 plate exchanger. Plus they have the hot sleeves Mike shows above. Sigh, all it takes is $$$.

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I think if you allow some time for warm up, especially on ultra cold days, you'd be ok without a timer. When you shut down hot, the fuel should be pretty clear, at least in the filter. I'd think you would have enough time to warm the filter during your normal engine warm-up.

2 years ago, I got caught with #2 diesel in a tractor, and 10 below temps. Lets just say my fuel was very cloudy. I put new filters on just to get it back to the shop (15 minutes) and it was starting to miss already. Put the queen bee heater on it, added a bunch of #1, and it was fine the rest of the winter... What I am trying to say here is; I'd think you would have enough time for the filter heaters to work, even without a pre heat cycle... Just give em some time!

I have 1 YO batteries, and just cycling the grids 2x, I barely have enough to start a cold (not plugged in) engine. (hence my post on finding a new cord for the block heater!) ha ha. I'd be screwed if I had to take any more amps out to preheat a filter...

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I wonder how I could wire those heaters up so that they are on a timer. Just realized they are 12 volt so they would run off the truck battery. Would only want to run them for a couple hours in the morning

They will kill the batteries in short order, they are really for when the truck is already running. If it gels in the tank and filters enough to not flow for the first couple minutes then it's gelled in the injectors, pump, etc.

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