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burb31

mechanical or electric gauge

22 posts in this topic

getting ready to update fuel lift pump .....probly a raptor..was going to put in a fuel press gauge and noticed the elec I was looking at is bout 30 dollars more.....any thoughts on which one to go with and why...was looking at isspro....I imagine the electric is a little less of a pain to install...is it as accurate?...

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I would go with mechanical. There is a lot of talk about the safety issue but diesel hardly ignites. You have to get a flame on it and get the fuel hot and then it will ignite, more like burn. Gas ignites instantly on any spark, diesel takes a lot to get it to go. I have been burning brush with diesel and if I soak a leaf with diesel I have to sit there with a lighter on the fuel for 5 seconds to get it to do anything, if not longer. If you wreck good enough that you have that kind of heat for that long, in your cab, your lift pump will have surely turned off in such a catastrophe so there won't hardly be any fuel coming out of that tiny line for the gauge. If it was to get hot, I am betting you would be dead before the fuel lit, it takes that much heat. You can pour diesel on the floor in a line and it will slowllly progress down it, after you spend a long time just trying to light it. Both ways require you to tap into the fuel line, both ways need wires ran into the cab. Both of them need needle valves also to rectify the pulsations. The mechanical is probably more accurate also.

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Both are good gauges and both need to be protected from the water hammer so either way you go your going to need either a needle valve or a snubber... The only downside to electric gauges its possible to be inaccurate from poor wiring connections.

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what exactly is a needle valve and where do you get one?

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The needle valve is from NAPA, part number WH6820. If you use a snubber, a grease gun hose will work.

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I would go with mechanical. There is a lot of talk about the safety issue but diesel hardly ignites. You have to get a flame on it and get the fuel hot and then it will ignite, more like burn. Gas ignites instantly on any spark, diesel takes a lot to get it to go.

And ISX has a electrical guage :lmao: ....... hahahahahahahaha (**footnote - its for EGT's - but it still sounded funny) :tease:

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I got a mechanical 30 psi di pricol optix gauge with a needle valve and it works great. The gauge was around $40 from Wally at FTE diesel and with the fuel line, column mount and needle valve I have about $125 total in it.

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The needle valve is from NAPA, part number WH6820. If you use a snubber, a grease gun hose will work.

So the needle valve is just a shut off valve that you just open a small amount and the snubber just isolates the sending unit and has some "give" to absorb the pulse?

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Yes, that is true. If using the snubber, make sure that you have at least a 90* bend in it. This way the impulses from the VP are absorbed. With the needle valve, you open it just enough to get the gauge to move and show the pressure.

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There has been such a huge scare about fuel being in the cab for years now and how you need to use a isolator... Diesel fuel needs to be heated to at least 150*F before it will ignite with open flame. The needle valve is a perfect choice for fuel hammer (water hammer) reduction. Because it allows you to reduce the pulse by closing till you get a smooth swing of the needle. Then if you do have a leak you can just shut the needle valve off. With a snubber it will keep the fuel hammer from occuring but now you can't turn off the fuel is there is a leak.

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You won't find me plumbing fuel into my cab, not for the fire scare but have you ever tried to clean the diesel smell out of clothing, carpet, or say behind a dash where you can't get a wipe and degreaser?I have an electrical and will always run electrical for oil and fuel.

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thanks for the info, I like mechanical gauges but where I want to mount it a wire would be easier to hide

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I have my fuel line tapped right above the stock fuel filter. Is this where the needle valve would go?Also, if this acts as a shut off valve, this would be a benefit when changing the fuel filter because you would not have to purge the line from fuel filter to isolator of air. Just simply shut it off before changing filter. Correct?

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I have my fuel line tapped right above the stock fuel filter. Is this where the needle valve would go? Also, if this acts as a shut off valve, this would be a benefit when changing the fuel filter because you would not have to purge the line from fuel filter to isolator of air. Just simply shut it off before changing filter. Correct?

I have mine plumbed in the same way with a needle valve on top of the canister. I just changed the filter but didnt turn off the needle valve and the gauge is working perfect. I was gonna change my line from the canister to the vp but I believe Mike said it might beat the gauge to death.:shrug:

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The source of the water hammer is coming from the the VP44 so closer you get to the VP44 the stronger the pulses get. If I could get the time and extra fund I want to move back to the stock filter can instead of middle of the line...

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I got everything except the needle valve....pickin it up from napa tomorrow.I think I'm gonna mount the gauge in the cubby hole next to the radio. I picked up a plastic plate from Geno's garage.....I hope this doesn't end up lookin cheesy...thought about the steering column mount but it looked like it would obstruct the view of the speedo a bit

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The source of the water hammer is coming from the the VP44 so closer you get to the VP44 the stronger the pulses get. If I could get the time and extra fund I want to move back to the stock filter can instead of middle of the line...

is yours between the filter can andthe vp or the filtercan and your airdog?

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i take it that is yep to the filter can and the airdog. iwas thinking of putting mine even further back. like near the pump.

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You won't find me plumbing fuel into my cab, not for the fire scare but have you ever tried to clean the diesel smell out of clothing, carpet, or say behind a dash where you can't get a wipe and degreaser? I have an electrical and will always run electrical for oil and fuel.

I have a Mechanical Fuel Gauge w/isolator that is mounted under hood.Line from the isolator to the gauge in the cab is just filled with 50/50 anti-freeze only about an ounce. The only issue i have is i get air in the line from filter housing to isolator sometimes if i run my Aux tank low,then the needle bounces and i have to bleed the line.

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I am showing 17 to 18 on my fuel gauge....dont think I ever seen it drop below 15 while driving. Is 17 or 18 ok....at what point is it too high?

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