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Brand of tires?


oldbeek

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I am looking for openions on tires. My last two sets of Michelin265/75 R16 X radial lt tires only got 42,000 miles each. I beleive the original tires were BF Goodrich T/A and they went 62,000 miles. I am looking at a set of Yokohama tires with the same rating as the Michelin for $750.00 verses Michelin at $1050.00 a set. Had good luck with Yokohama 15yrs back in fleet service(11R22.5s)

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I've only had one set of Yokohama's in my life. They must of been a harder compound, not sure of wear, but when you hit moisture, they slid over the water. Almost went over a cliff because of it. Tires were changed real quick. Lost money on them, but learned a lesson. There might be some here that like them, but I recommend anything besides Yokohama.

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Hmmm, I have had Yok's on my truck for the last three years and have had quite the opposite experience. I have decent traction in rain, snow, ice, and dirt. I will need a new set in the spring. I do not think they wore quite as long as the last set of Michelin's I had, but for the price difference, I cannot complain. I will replace my tires with another set of Yok's

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I got 85K out of the original BF goodrich rough country tires on my 05, I could have gotten about 5-10K more I think but they were getting pretty thin for winter use. I now have Hankook dynapro ATMs and they seem to be doing well, have 20k on them and they hardly show any wear yet.I have run Yokohama in the past and had great success with them, They have a not so aggressive look that is very deceiving, those things dug better than a lot of at's I have run over the years. Got pretty good mileage from them too.On my Hemi I have Wild country at's and they are ok too.Overall I like the BF Goodrich tires for overall longevity and durability.I got 85K out of a set of 285/75/16 BF AT's years ago and sold them to a friend who put another 20K on them before they were smooth. I had them siped when new and that will help with longevity on any tire too. I had thousands of miles of gravel miles and a lot of that with a trailer on and they did not chunk out like some claim siped tires will do on gravel.

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Not to sound like a @$%& or anything, but there's tons of threads here, already, talking about this very same thing :)

Not to sound the same way but Tire technology and tire design and compounds do change as well as many new tread designs and tire brands come along so any new info is always welcome, so there!:evilgrin:
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It amazes me how different peoples experiences with tires can be. One person can claim 85k miles from tire "X" while the next person claims half that. I wonder if ones driving habits and terrain could actually have that much effect? What really makes me wonder is if someone can get 85k miles out of tire X but only 40k out of tire "Y", is there that much difference in tire quality? Especially when someone else gets completely opposite results from the same tire. I guess my whole point in rambling is, if youve gotten good results from Yokohama in the past, youll probably get good results with them again. Theres so many variables in peoples experiences with tires I think its good to take it all in yet in the end your results may vary from others :thumbup2:

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driving habits, terrain, weather, and hard-surface composition definitely play a part in how long tires last. Additionally, and maybe more importantly, is the maintenance one may or may not do with tires (air pressure, rotations, alignment, etc.)I had DynaPro MT03s (305-75-16-E) on my truck for about a year, and put about 15k on them. They barely looked used at all..I stepped down in size (235-85-16-E) and went with Federal Couragia MTs. I put about 10K on them (under basically the same conditions) and they looked nearly worn out.Tire material/composition has a lot to do with how a tire wears.

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driving habits, terrain, weather, and hard-surface composition definitely play a part in how long tires last. Additionally, and maybe more importantly, is the maintenance one may or may not do with tires (air pressure, rotations, alignment, etc.)

I typically get about 30-40K out of set of tires. My biggest problem is dirt roads and exhaust brakes usage. I really good about rotation and keeping pressures in check. I know I've posted it before but here I got again...

(axle weight / 2) / tire weight capacity ) x tire max inflation = suggested inflation pressure

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From my personal experience the fastest tire wear on my rigs comes on the rear tires in the summer on dry hot pavement while towing.

I find that gravel has little effect on how fast a good tire wears. I have seen some tires wear extremely fast on gravel but a high quality AT shouldn't be affected too much unless it has a trailer on back most of the time.

I usually drive pretty easy and do not go burning or spinning them as I am cheap and don't like wasting money that way.

The fastest way to wear tires out is on wet gravel, wet rubber is way more easily sliced that dry rubber.

I can't find the video of a demonstration on an off road mine truck tire where a guy lays the blade of a machette on the tread and tries to hammer the blade into the rubber and it just bounced, he then took a spray bottle of water and wet the same area and did the same thing and it drove the machette blade into the tire with only 2 hits demonstrating how wet rubber and sharp wet gravel would do the same thing.

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My truck had the optional size Michillins when I bought it... 61K so far. I do indeed notice after towing heavy, the tread is dark as it it's wearing more. Someday soon, I'll need new rubber. These tires are supposedly AT but not very open faced for that.

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