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Performance Disk Brake's


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Howdy again all so it's been about a year and a half or 10k mile's since i put on new Brake pads front and rear. and they are begining to squell when i apply them so guess it's time for new one's but, while i'm into it the factory rotor's probaly would like to be relived of duty after 200k mile's. I've been looking around and Found this website from a friend who use's it and like's them http://brakeperformance.com/brake-rotors/Premium-Dimpled-and-Slotted-Brake-Rotors.php . I want the best one's since i'm towing alot of weight most the time so the Drilled and slotted one's are a must. Comparing number's to number's with Napa and this site they are the same other then the material's there made of and a huge price difference But is the quality a huge difference i'd rather not have them fail down a 6% hill with my heavy camper riding me like a horse down hill not that the dual trailer brake's don't work lol  

 

Front

Napa Price  

Both side's $320+tax

 

Other website

both side's $197.50 no tax + Free shipping

 

Rear

Napa Price $330+tax

 

Other Website

Both Side's $200.00 no tax + Free shipping

 

Napa Rotor material Created w/ High Carbon Damped Iron

 

Website Rotor Material Premium High Quality Cast Iron It's the word "cast Iron" i hate i'm a farm machinery Mechanic and deal with Cast iron every darn day and i hate it so so so much by far the dumbest thing man invented in many many year's it's break amazing easy can't take heat at all and if hot then cool cracks very easy but this is 40 year old cast not sure if new stuff is better any opinion's would be great

Edited by GreenRiverCummins
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I would consider a exhaust brake well before throwing that kind of money at rotor and brakes. Wow! :wow:

 

No problems here coming down 16% grade loaded.

oa7sr4.jpg

 

I bought the cheapest brake pads from RockAuto.Com for both axles $50 bucks. Still running OEM rotors. 229k miles total only done 1 brake job ever!

 

29woi1w.jpg

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Going through a set of pads in 10k miles is a little ridiculous. I would definitely look at getting some kind of exhaust brake or something else before wasting money on more brakes that will just wear out in short order again.

 

What?! 10k miles for set of pads?! Holy Cow!

 

Exhaust brake 185k on a set of pads. I could of cleared 200k but didn't want to push my luck.

 

All high performance pads are is a brake pad with more metal in it to bite the rotor harder which in turn causes more rotor wear in the long run. So I bought the absolute cheapest brake pads from RockAuto.Com with the least amount of metal in them and still to this day don't touch my service brakes till under 20-25 MPH.

 

 

 

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I have run mine on the stock rotors and cheaper after market front and rear rotors with inexpensive pads.  I pull a 15k# 5th wheel and have seen many 6% grades. Both before and after adding the e brake. The e brake was as good as any performance mod I have installed and well worth the money. 6% grade in 4th gear and very little use of the brakes.

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  • 1 month later...

My first thought is, did you "not" use brake grease and they are starting to scream? "most likely cause at 10,000mi"

 

My second thought is you are a man who doesn't like to down shift, and needs to start using Ceramic Pads!

 

I could not see any reason to go through that many is pulling logs down a mountain in Colorado going way too fast!

 

Definitely need to look at calipers! 

 

I would stick to High Grade Carbon Steel Rotors.

You couldn't pay me to put cast iron on any vehicle, not even a moped!

Edited by eddielee
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An Ebrake is on my wish list too. They're around a thousand bucks, even more, I'd like to have one of the new, think there VE style of turbo, where the vanes open close as needed, for performance or stopping!

Dave

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My first thought is, did you "not" use brake grease and they are starting to scream? "most likely cause at 10,000mi"

 

My second thought is you are a man who doesn't like to down shift, and needs to start using Ceramic Pads!

 

I could not see any reason to go through that many is pulling logs down a mountain in Colorado going way too fast!

 

Definitely need to look at calipers! 

 

I would stick to High Grade Carbon Steel Rotors.

You couldn't pay me to put cast iron on any vehicle, not even a moped!

Grease can be a problem , my thought was it a incompatability of grease, aluminium vs lithium ?

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Well I doubt the Calipers are bad the orignal owner repacled the front one's a week before i bought it along with the hard/and rubber line's due to some slight rust. He also changed the Brake fluid since he was in there. Have recipets to prove all that and i replaced the rear cailpers due to one locking up going down the road....I did use that grease stuff the 16yr old kid at autozone keep throwing at my face to buy telling me how i had to have it then giving me the wrong set of pads three time's. Learned the first time i drove all the way home to open the box to make sure whats inside is what i need.. And My driving style which even my father calls granny driving is to relase the gas pedal about a mile from a red light coast using the tranny to slow down(to a point if you have a Dual disk clutch you'll understand it can rattle my dash bezel off from the shakeing empty... loaded isn't nearly as bad.) Of course you never know they may be bad again will check to be sure quailty control is a joke today all about quantity now.

Edited by GreenRiverCummins
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First mistake "autozone."

 

If you drive this way then I really doubt the pads are bad or at fault.

The only way I see squealing at this point is if the rear has issues and the front is compensating for them.

 

I have many times had to clean up my calipers extremely well as they would not operate correctly. Causing the outter or inner pad to be thinner than the other.

Since you used the brake grease I lean more towards the rotors and cleaning the caliper/mount point extremely well and using the brake grease in there as well.

 

If it was me I would take it apart clean and check the calipers and pads, re-grease well and and use a micrometer to check the rotors to see what condition they are truly in.

 

I usually don't have my rotors nor drums turned, the new pads do this for me. If there is excessive grooving in the rotors the pads would last only about half as long. Changed at correct intervals it is preferred to use a Dremel or some sand paper to roughen up the rotors so they do not squeal right off.

 

I do highly recommend using ceramic pads as they have less friction and heat the rotors less, causing less wear overall.

Edited by eddielee
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  • 3 weeks later...

Are you assuming there bad just because there are making noise? Did you take wheel off and look how much pad is left. In my experience noise does not mean they are bad its just pad shifting around caliper. If you think drilled and slotted rotors are going to help longevity you would be wrong, they will wear out pads quicker, it might stop a little better, but there is a sacrifice in pad life.  Just my 2 cents.

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I do highly recommend using ceramic pads as they have less friction and heat the rotors less, causing less wear overall.

The only problem with harder pads is increased rotor wear. You may need to replace the rotors when you replace pads with ceramics and get two or even three sets of organic pads to one set of rotors.

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Drilled/Slotted rotors are not all they are cracked up to be in towing applications. You lose surface area and thus lower braking, they really only work well in overside rotor applications for racing needs.

 

If you are having to ride  your brakes for a long steep grade then you need an exhaust brake.

 

After years reading about brakes for these trucks I have come to the conclusion that nothing beats OEM, so you might look there.

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After years reading about brakes for these trucks I have come to the conclusion that nothing beats OEM, so you might look there.

Yep, they have the longevity of rotors balanced out with the pads.

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Drilled/Slotted rotors are not all they are cracked up to be in towing applications. You lose surface area and thus lower braking, they really only work well in overside rotor applications for racing needs.

 

If you are having to ride  your brakes for a long steep grade then you need an exhaust brake.

 

After years reading about brakes for these trucks I have come to the conclusion that nothing beats OEM, so you might look there.

 

 

Your last statement really hinges on the overall quality of OEM equipment in the first place. The early 2nd gen brakes with the single piston calipers leave much to be desired. I can tell you the EBC slotted rotors and matching pads I am running along with DOT5.1 fluid are a drastic improvement over what came on my truck. I have had 2 instances where they have performed exceptionally well under extreme heat and not warped or faded. One was when I had a caliper stick on me 300 miles from home. The rotor was nearly glowing and the smoke was rolling out from under the truck before I noticed it (running down the freeway)  It had a very slight shimmy when it was all said and done so I had my buddy turn it down and didn't take much to true it back out. The other instance happens every year where we go 4 wheeling in West Virginia, it is a 2-3 mile grade of 15% give or take coming into the camp site. 4low, 1st and 2nd gear all the way up and the same scenario going back down. Hauling a 6-7k lb trailer to boot, and each time we get to the bottom my buddy in his 2012 Chevy has to stop at the bottom to cool his brakes. The first year he actually cooked them because he thought he could go down in the high side even though I advised against it. Learned that lesson the hard way.

 

I'm not saying that slotted rotors can offer better longevity, but I am a firm believer that there are much better matched braking components out there, to increase stopping power, particularly for the 2nd gen trucks.

Edited by diesel4life
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