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Those with block heaters, and use them, I have a question..How "hot" does your coolant get when plugged in overnight? I realize this could be dependent on ambient temps, possibly, but I'm curious. As an example, my block heater heats the coolant to ~100*F when plugged in overnight. Is this a normal temp for these things? Seems my '96 got hotter than that, but not 100% positive.

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Not enough to move the needle on your temp gauge, I cant remember the exact number off the top of my head but ill see if I can find it real quick. -Jordan-

The few times I have used mine it did not move the gauge either. But he cab warmed up quicker though. are you healing Jordan?
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for me, ive had mine plugged in overnight during winter and ranges from 45f to 5f i still have heat around 5 minutes after starting the beast. it gets to full temp in 10 minutes or around there. so yeah its got to be round 100 or so. I do suggest plugging it in after you park and the engine is still hot, easier to keep it warm then try to warm up the block and water dead cold.

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Thanks guys. ambient temp was 32*F this morning, and my Edge showed 112*F coolant temp..

That's about right... Back in my fire fighter days I use to keep it plugged in all the time. With the garage temp about 32-35*F in the winter it would float about 110-120*F clooant temp and then manifold temp (IAT) would be right there close to it.
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sounds like it is the cord, but in reality either could be at fault.In order to swap out you need to pup a freeze plug, so my advice is to drain the coolant down into bottles, once the radiator is almost empty about 2/3's the way you should be suffice to do it.I used the middle plug under the turbo. Alternatively you could ohm text the wires on the plug.

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Mine is a 3rd gen, but I believe they have the same block heater. On a ~0°F night I get to mid 80's with the winter front closed off. On a ~20° night I get to about 110° with the winter front closed off. On a ~30° night I get to about 120° with one or two flaps open on the winter front. All the temps drop about 10° when I start the truck, and unless its really windy the IAT is within 5° of the coolant at startup. I use a timer and on a night when its 15°+ I generally get to 90°-95° in 90 minutes, nearly all the temp for a fraction of the cost.

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Mine is a 3rd gen, but I believe they have the same block heater. On a ~0°F night I get to mid 80's with the winter front closed off. On a ~20° night I get to about 110° with the winter front closed off. On a ~30° night I get to about 120° with one or two flaps open on the winter front. All the temps drop about 10° when I start the truck, and unless its really windy the IAT is within 5° of the coolant at startup. I use a timer and on a night when its 15°+ I generally get to 90°-95° in 90 minutes, nearly all the temp for a fraction of the cost.

My numbers above are within a unheated garage at about 32-35*F. This goes to show you that just getting the vehicle in out of the blowing wind can make a difference in the performance of the block heater. Because of the amount of coolant and cast iron your heating just makes since to get it out of the wind if possible.
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