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Found 22 results

  1. You are never going to believe it, the vp44 CAN be "rebuilt" in your shop/garage/lean-to!! Since my pump went out I have been feverishly searching for a cheap fix or the at least the cheapest rebuild I could possibly find……how does about $40.00 sound?!?! I have researched this in depth and found the common problems that cause vp44 failure, most of them are manufacturing process related (burrs left on metal components, pump case wearing through due to lack of lubrication, and parts seizing due to improper lubrication) Once the components have worn down they seize and of course the pump stops working, the less common failure is the electrical pack solders become weak and loose their proper connection, the connections could possibly be re-soldered but for the most part, when the electronics fail the pump has to be sent in as the electrical pack is calibrated to connect to the ECM on a calibration bench and unless you have a 100k to drop on a bench you may as well get a reman pump. As for the rest of the internal moving parts, it seemed to me you could just replace them….better yet, I found a guy that simply honed the parts and sanded them down with some fine grit sanding paper to relieve the clearance on these parts, he replaced the gaskets and lo and behold….his truck is now running!! I am in the process of ordering the gasket set he found and also am looking for the proper tool to remove the tamperproof bolts that hold the pump together, within the next couple weeks I will be attempting to rebuild my pump assuming the internal parts are seized and the electronics pack is not toast, once I have it apart it should be relatively obvious what the culprit is….. Here is a link to the site I found this information on, http://www.dieseltruckresource.com/dev/vp44-rebuilding-t111329.html in this thread you will find the part number as well as the contact information for ordering the gasket set to fix what is a ridiculously expensive problem for an otherwise excellent truck. This already worked out for at least one guy that had a bit of common sense and know how, I see no reason the same line of thought wouldn’t take care of many peoples vp44 headaches!! GAWD I HOPE THIS WORKS!!!!!!!
  2. How to remove the Bosch VP44 Injection Pump the quick and easy way. Takes approximately 45 minutes for me to remove the VP44 Injection pump. Remove the Mopar1973Man Crankcase vent (if applicable) Using a 10mm socket remove the four air horn bolts and one dipstick bolt. Using a 7/16 or 11mm socket loosen the top clamp of the intake boot. Move the grid heater and intake horn out of your way. Pack a shop rag in the intake to prevent stuff from falling in the intake manifold. Using a 13mm socket loosen the 3 bolts holding the APPS sensor and unplug and move over toward the driver side fender. Now unplug the VP44 main connector and wire tap . This connector is a two step plug lock. Pull the release tab and wiggle the plug out then pull a bit more on the release and the plug should release fully. Now using a 10mm loosen the 3 bolts holding the 1,2,4 injection rail in place. Using a 3/4" wrench loosen 1,2,4 injection lines. Now remove 1,2,4 injection lines as a group. Using a 3/4" wrench remove the overflow valve banjo and remove your supply line (may differ from mine being a big line kit) Now remove the crankcase vent. Just unscrews normal right hand threads. Do not pry on the nipple. Use an oil filter wrench or a strap wrench to loosen stubborn vent covers. Now remove the pump shaft nut with a 1 1/16 inch socket. Be careful removing the nut and lock washer that you don't drop them down into the gear case. A stubby Phillips screwdriver and a magnet is handy you can slide it off the shaft onto the Phillips screwdriver. Using a 23mm socket roll the alternator towards the coolant bottle to bring the keyway on the pump gear to TDC position and then install your gear puller and pull the gear loose on the shaft. Now loosen the 3,5,6 lines but you do not have to remove the injection line set. Now you want to loosen the 2 bolts on the rear bracket with a 13mm socket. Now remove the 4 nuts holding the pump to the gear case. Now careful kick the 3,5,6 lines out there nipples towards the block. Now lightly pry the VP44 injection pump away from the case and remove. Check for the key in the shaft make sure its present. This is what you should have after removal...
  3. Fuel Pressure Specification For Bosch VP44 Injection Pumps Here is a copy of the fuel system specifications from the Dodge Factory Service Manual. This is for your Dodge Cummins Turbo diesel truck with a Bosch VP44 injection pump. Fuel pressure Normal fuel pressure should float about 14-15 PSI running down the pavement. It should never fall below 10 PSI at all. Here is a colorize fuel pressure gauge to give you a clue of the fuel pressure span you want. You want the needle to stay in the green at all times. Yellow zone is a warning that you should check the fuel filter, lift pump performance, overflow valve, etc. This is undocumented maximum pressure is 20 PSI. Now take notice to the overflow valve is set for 14 PSI so excessive pumping of fuel does nothing for performance except create more heat in the fuel, which in turns reduces the cooling ability of the fuel and adds more stress to the lift pump. So a little extra fuel pressure is a good thing because it ensures the Bosch VP44 injection pump stays cooled and lubricated properly. However, excessive fuel pressure will heat the fuel and reduced the cooling ability of the fuel. Now always remember that the only lubrication the Bosch VP44 injection pump will see is the fuel itself so if you don't have enough fuel pressure it will cause damage to the Bosch VP44 injection pump. It's like the same as running the engine with low oil pressure it will continue to run, but the damage to the engine will occur. On the other hand, the Bosch VP44 injection pumps, which happen to be about $1,200 to replace. Pressure Drop The amount of fuel pressure drop between idle and wide-open throttle. 2-3 PSI drop from idle to WOT is normal. However, 5 PSI or more pressure drop from idle to WOT is pointing out a failed lift pump, plugged filter, and/or plumbing restrictions. 2-3 PSI Is Normal Dropping more than 5 PSI is pointing towards a failed lift pump, plugged filter, or restrictive plumbing. Just to show you the difference in the stock plumbing which is 6mm ID plumbing and most performance pumps come with 1/2" ID plumbing. These pictures will give you an idea... The first picture is a Big Line fitting over the top of the stock plumbing. Then the second picture compares the stock 6mm ID steel lines to a 1/2" ID Big Line hose. The best way to show this example of restrictions is to let's say your house is on fire. You know your garden hose has 80 PSI of pressure, but the garden hose is only 5/8" ID hose. Your wife calls 911 and gets the fire department coming in the meantime you keep fighting the fire with your little 5/8" garden hose and losing the battle. The fire department shows up and pulls a 2 1/2" hose off the truck and charges it at 80 PSI and now winning the battle. Your fire is put out! What is so different? No matter what the size of the fuel line will dictate how much volume can be pushed through the fuel line. Like the story above the water pressure was the same at 80 PSI, but the hose size jumped from 5/8" to 2 1/2" ID hose and the volume changes are the size of hose. So the same thing applies to the stock fuel system. The stock banjo bolts and 6mm ID pipes are just too restrictive and cannot supply enough volume of fuel for that Bosch VP44 injection pump demands. This why I highly suggest you go up to 1/2" ID plumbing. Reasons Why Fuel Pressure Is Critical Let's take a look at a Bosch VP44 injection pump. I've labeled the fuel lines supplying fuel and return line plus the overflow valve. Now I know there is a ton of rumors on the internet of all kinds of minimum pressures for a Bosch VP44 injection pump. I'm going to say stick with the Dodge Factory Service Manual Specifications for fuel pressure. Now let's talk a bit more about the flow of the fuel. The lift pump supplies pressurized fuel to the Bosch VP44 injection pump the overflow valve regulates how much fuel pressure is held. Excessive fuel pressure is returned to the fuel tank. The picture below is of the bleed hole in the overflow valve this image was magnified x10 to show you how small the bleed hole really is. Give you an idea the size of the hole use a single strand of 14 AWG copper wire, and it will NOT fit the hole. The bleed hole is there solely for bleeding air out of the system which air will pass through this tiny hole rather easy but fuel will not. However, if you're looking for long life from a Bosch VP44 injection pump, I would personally suggest you adjust your minimum pressure to 14 PSI this will ensure the overflow valve remain open and a constant fuel flow through the Bosch VP44 injection pump and keep it cool all the time. Let me play out a simple scenario. Let's say my fuel pressure is roughly 10-11 PSI. I'm going to drive up into the back country approximately 40 miles with my Dodge Cummins towing an 8x8 utility trailer. Now the whole trip heading uphill into the mountain towing an empty trailer is going to be enough fuel flowing to the injectors to keep the Bosch VP44 injection pump happy. However, I've spent the day and loaded up with firewood and now coming back down the mountain loaded. I'm using my exhaust brake and coasting most of the way down taking it slow and easy. At this point, the injectors are no longer firing so the Bosch VP44 injection pump is not pumping fuel out to the injectors. Furthermore, the overflow valve closes at about 10-11 PSI so let's say it did close. Now where is the fuel going??? Nowhere! It is pooled up in the injection pump and gaining heat and being broke down. You've also removed the cooling and lubricating of the Bosch VP44 injection pump so now it actually taking on damage. To give you a feel for the fuel flow coming from the injection pump with an AirDog 150 at 17.5 PSI of fuel pressure, I've got a video to explain that quickly. I've heard rumors of some people trying to develop a cool down system for the Bosch VP44 Injection pump but after making the video above, there is just no way to cool down the injection pump using the lift pump of even the AirDog/FASS series. The whole problem is the restrictions inside the Bosch VP44 injection pump and the overflow valve as seen in the video above. So the only way to keep the Bosch VP44 injection pump cool is to keep fuel flowing through it at all times. So to keep the overflow valve open I suggest the 14 PSI minimum pressure. I'm currently at 136K miles on my Bosch VP44 injection pump and still going strong using a 16 PSI minimum pressure and an 18 PSI idle pressure. Here is a short video of stable fuel pressure from 55 MPH to 70 MPH at WOT. Here is another video done with idling, cruising, and WOT operation. Yes. I got a bit carried away and sloshed the fuel in the tank and sucked an air bubble and the pressure fell off. Cranking Pressure Test Here is a simple test on how to do the test for cranking fuel pressure. Pull the fuel pump relay in the PDC and then attempt to start the engine. Pay attention to the fuel pressure gauge during cranking. Be aware this test will trip a P1689 code and light the CHECK ENGINE light. Excessive cranking pressure can lead to difficult starting problems. Suggested Lift Pump Replacement You should replace the stock fuel system completely since it cannot supply enough fuel for even stock requirements without causing damage to the Bosch VP44 injection pump or adding stress to the lift pump. The pumps I suggest are proven and come with a lifetime warranty. These pumps come with a full kit and replace everything from the fuel tank to Bosch VP44 injection pump. AirDog 100, 150, or 165 Raptor 100 or 150 FASS 100 or 150 FASS DDRP (DDRP Ver.2 - 89 GPH) I don't suggest these pumps... Because they don't address the pump location, plumbing restrictions, or come with much of warranty. Stock Carter or Carter Campaign Pump (4090046) Holley Blue or Holley Black FASS DDRP (DDRP Ver.1 - 40 GPH) AirTex Mopar's Notes: That was true for the DDRP Ver.1 However, DDRP-02 is rated at 89 GPH and will hold pressure. It is listed as a Stock replacement pump designed to perform better than the Stock pump, but not for Chips that add fueling. I place a Power Puck on my truck with the DDRP-02 and saw no difference in FP at either idle or WOT, (PP is a timing chip doesn't change the amount of fuel). That said the PP is currently removed from my truck as I overpowered my clutch both loaded and unloaded, back to the stock clutch is fine. Looking for a Valair possible DD organic, or SD Kevlar/Ceramic. It is currently in the stock location and giving 15 psi at idle and 10 at WOT. Information Provided By: rhagfo http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/98-5-02-powertrain/404412-fass-ddrp-02-a.html#post4197714 Additional Information (About Performance Crowds & Fuel Pressure) I've seen several times where people will link back to performance pump builders and quoting where they say, "(Un-named) proved that 5 PSI, under load, made all the horsepower the VP44 pump could make, even with stock fuel lines, fittings and supply pump." This might be true but there is nothing ever said about the life span of the pump at these conditions. So... Please do not follow these performance crowds into destroying a perfectly good Bosch VP44 injection pump. The fact still remains from Bosch the actual designer of the Bosch VP44 injection pump states that injection pump should return 70% of the fuel back to the fuel tank for cooling and lubrication purpose of the VP44. Being the only way a Bosch VP44 injection pump can do this is to have fuel pressure above 14 PSI to open the overflow valve. Then if the stock Bosch VP44 injection pump with an enhancement box say an Edge Comp on 5x5 can consume 15-20 GPH that means the stock 35 GPH pump cannot keep up with Bosch's design of 70% return volume. So this why products like AirDog, Raptor and FASS was created because they actually meet the demands of the Bosch VP44 injection pump. Then another fact that Bosch will let you know of is that diaphragm damage occurs from operating the Bosch VP44 injection pump at low fuel pressures. Making matters worse is that no Bosch injection re-builder will void warranty a VP44 injection pump with diaphragm damage. Dead give away that you had a bad lift pump or low fuel pressure problems. Please view the Bosch VP44 exploded view page to see there is no diaphragm in the Revision 027 Bosch VP44 Injection Pump Then the other fact is right from the Dodge Factory Service Manual has the minimum fuel pressures (picture at the top of the page). It even states the pressure that the overflow valve requires to open. Refer to the Overflow Valve Testing from the Dodge Factory Service Manual and see that the overflow valve should remain closed at 10 PSI and open by 14 PSI. So if the overflow valve is close by 10 PSI, then you extra cooling and lubrication just disappeared. So ultimately it suggested having a fuel system of no less than 100 GPH supply that can maintain a minimum pressure of 14-15 PSI at WOT. This will great extend the life of the VP44 because it keeps the electronics cooler longer and keeps the rotating parts lubricated properly. So please people let the facts and information from the actual designers of the injection pump (Bosch) and engine (Cummins) provide you proper information for your fuel system for your engine. Don't be swayed by performance shops claim of high horse output with little fuel pressure. As I proved right here doesn't work for the longevity of the VP44 injection pump... Another thing to bring up there are people that are increasing fuel pressures above 20 PSI. Please don't do this. The return port leaving the VP44 pump isn't very big at all. The return port is on the left and supply is on the right. As you can see increasing fuel pressures above 20 PSI put you at risk for shaft seal failure. Increasing the pressure above 20 PSI isn't going to improve the return flow. I say stick with the 14-20 PSI pressure range for seal safety. Additional Information (About Maximum Flow Rates) Here are some calculated flow abilities of the stock fuel system vs. 1/2" big line kits. This is not calculating bend, turns, offices just straight flow for open end plumbing and this is a rough calculation. Pipe Size Gallon Per Hour Flow Rate Gallon Per Minute Flow Rate 6mm ID pipe 75 GPH @ 15 PSI 1.2 GPM @ 15 PSI 1/2" ID pipe 570 GPH @ 15 PSI 9.5 GPM @ 15 PSI Use The banjo bolt Shrader valve to test for fuel pressure, Item 3 in the above diagram. If you have a 98-99 truck the port might be on top of the fuel filter housing. You can see the 90* bend fitting coming out of the top of the fuel filter housing in the below picture. Install a Shrader valve and test from there. I'm hearing of tales of shops, mechanics, or dealers doing the old hook up the fuel pressure gauge and only checking fuel pressure at idle. This is wrong. Because I've seen lots of cases where fuel line restriction, fuel filter plugging, gelling fuel and other thing causing fuel pressure to drop out under load. Like this video from a friend of mine, you'll see he's got awesome fuel pressure at an idle (where most shops gave him the green light). However, what the shops did not test for is WOT at highway speed, and you'll see in the video, he can pull way down to 0 PSI. Anything under 14 PSI is a concern... Anything under 10 PSI is a serious problem. As for having a gauge in the cab all Dodge Cummins trucks should have a fuel pressure gauge in the cab. Because like you seen bench testing with an idle pressure is meaningless if you can't see the WOT pressure at highway speed.
  4. Bosch VP44 Injection Pump Replacement Removal 1. Disconnect both negative battery cables at both batteries. Cover and isolate ends of cables. 2. Thoroughly clean fuel lines at cylinder head and injection pump ends. Thoroughly clean Bosch VP44 injection pump and supply/return lines at side of pump. 3. Disconnect 9–way electrical connector at Fuel Pump Control Module (FPCM) (Fig. 22). 4. Remove fuel return line at side of Bosch VP44 injection pump by removing overflow valve (Fig. 23). Place rag beneath overflow valve to catch excess fuel. 5. Remove fuel supply line at side of Bosch VP44 injection pump by removing banjo bolt (Fig. 23). Also remove same line at top of fuel filter housing (banjo bolt). 6. Remove all high-pressure fuel lines, intake air tube, accelerator pedal position sensor, air intake housing, engine oil dipstick tube, wiring clips, electrical cables at intake heaters and engine lifting bracket. a. Remove the APPS sensor. Just unbolt the APPS and unhook the wires and tuck it back towards the firewall with the throttle cable attached. b. Remove the intake elbow 4 bolts and remove the air pipe on the driver side. As for the dipstick tube it can be move out of the way by twisting it carefully. c. Remove grid heater leaving the wires attached to the grid heater and tuck back out of the way. Mopar's Notes: Now you only need to remove 1,2,4 high pressure injector lines. The other 3,5,6 can remain attached to the engine but need to be removed from the Bosch VP44 injection pump. 7. Remove hose clamp at crankcase vent hose (Fig. 24) and remove the hose from the canister. 8. Remove (unscrew - right-hand thread) canister (Fig. 24) from gear cover. 9. Remove nut and washer retaining injection pump gear to Bosch VP44 injection pump shaft (Fig. 25) 10. The engine can be rotated with a barring tool such as Snap-On No. SP371, MTE No. 3377371 (Cummins Tool Division, or an equivalent. The opening for barring tool is located in rear flange of the engine on exhaust manifold side (Fig. 26). Remove rubber access plug covering this opening. A 15/16" socket on the alternator can be used as a barring tool. 11. Insert barring tool into flywheel housing opening (Fig. 26). 12. Rotate engine until keyway is at 12 o’clock position (Fig. 27). 13. Use T-bar type puller (Fig. 28) to separate injection pump gear from Bosch VP44 injection pump shaft. Attach two M8 X 1.24 MM (metric) screws through puller and into two threaded holes supplied in pump gear. Pull injection pump gear forward until it loosens from injection pump shaft. Pull on gear only enough to loosen it from the injection pump shaft. Pulling gear too far may cause damage or breakage to gear cover. 14. Remove 2 rear/lower pump bracket bolts (Fig. 29). 15. Remove 4 Bosch VP44 injection pump-to-gear housing mounting nuts. 16. Remove Bosch VP44 injection pump from gear housing. Take care not to nick injection pump shaft on aluminum gear housing when removing the pump. Also, be very careful not to drop pump keyway into gear housing. WARNING: Whenever the Bosch VP44 fuel injection pump is removed from the engine, the pump drive gear is laying loose on the camshaft drive gear. Never attempt to crank or rotate the engine with the pump removed from the engine. Serious damage will occur. To prevent pump/gear keyway from falling into gear housing, the engine must be rotated until keyway is at 12 o’clock position (Fig. 27). If gear retainer nut, washer or key drops into gear housing, the cover may have to be removed to retrieve them before the engine is started. Installation 1. Inspect pump mounting surfaces at the pump and the mounting flange for nicks, cuts or damage. Inspect o-ring surfaces for nicks, cuts or damage. 2. Clean injection pump mounting flange (Fig. 31) at gear housing. Also the clean front of the injection pump. 3. Install new rubber o-ring (Fig. 33) at pump mounting area. 4. Apply clean engine oil to the injection pump o-ring only. The machined tapers on both injection pump shaft and injection pump gear (Fig. 34) must be absolutely dry, clean and free of any dirt or oil film. This will ensure proper gear-to-shaft tightening. 5. Clean pump gear and pump shaft at machined tapers (Fig. 34) with an evaporative type cleaner such as brake cleaner. Keyway Installation: 6. The pump/gear keyway has an arrow and a 3–digit number stamped at top edge (Fig. 33). Position keyway into pump shaft with the arrow pointed to the rear of the pump. Also be sure 3–digit number stamped to top of keyway is same as 3–digit number stamped to injection pump data plate (Fig. 35). If wrong keyway is installed, a diagnostic trouble code may be set. Mopar's Notes: A suggestion is once you ready to place the key in the shaft take a few drops of super glue and glue it in place. This will keep the key from falling out during installation of the pump. 7. Position Bosch VP44 injection pump assembly to mounting flange on gear cover while aligning Bosch VP44 injection pump shaft through back of injection pump gear. When installing pump, dowel (Fig. 34) on mounting flange must align to hole in front of pump. 8. After Bosch VP44 injection pump is positioned flat to mounting flange, install four pump mounting nuts and tighten finger tight only. Do not attempt a final tightening at this time. Do not attempt to tighten (pull) Bosch VP44 injection pump to gear cover using mounting nuts. Damage to pump or gear cover may occur. The pump must be positioned flat to its mounting flange before attempting to tighten mounting nuts. 9. To prevent damage or cracking of components, tighten nuts/bolts in the following sequence: a. Install Bosch VP44 injection pump shaft washer and nut to pump shaft. Tighten nut finger tight only. b. Install 2 rear/lower pump mounting bolts finger tight only. c. Do preliminary tightening of Bosch VP44 injection pump shaft nut to 30 N·m (15–22 ft. lbs.) torque. This is not the final torque. d. Tighten 4 Bosch VP44 injection pump mounting nuts to 43 N·m (32 ft. lbs.) torque. e. Tighten 2 rear/lower Bosch VP44 injection pump bracket-to-pump bolts 24 N·m (18 ft. lbs.) torque. f. Do final tightening of Bosch VP44 injection pump shaft nut to 170 N·m (125 ft. lbs.) torque. Use barring tool to prevent engine from rotating when tightening gear. 10. Install canister (Fig. 24) to gear cover. 11. Install crankcase vent hose (Fig. 24) to canister and install hose clamp. 12. Using new gaskets, install fuel return line and overflow valve to side of Bosch VP44 injection pump (Fig. 23). Tighten overflow valve to 24 N·m (18 ft. lbs.) torque. 13. Using new gaskets, install fuel supply line to side of Bosch VP44 injection pump and top of fuel filter housing (Fig. 23). Tighten banjo bolts to 24 N·m (18 ft. lbs.) torque. 14. Install all high-pressure fuel lines, intake air tube, accelerator pedal position sensor, air intake housing, engine oil dipstick tube, wiring clips, electrical cables at intake heaters and engine lifting bracket. Tighten the fuel line(s) at the head to the injector connector(s) to 38 N·m (28 ft. lbs.) torque. 15. Connect 9–way electrical connector to Fuel Pump Control Module (FPCM) (Fig. 22). 16. Connect both negative battery cables to both batteries. 17. Bleed air from fuel system. 18. Check system for fuel or engine oil leaks.
  5. Bosch VP44 Injection Pump Requirements I'm going to do a quick article on requirements for long life from a Bosch VP44 injection pump. Here is the list of thing that are required to keeping a Bosch VP44 injection pump happy in your Cummins powered Truck. Fuel Pressure Fuel Filtration Fuel Lubricity Clean DC Power Fuel Pressure I know there is a lot of controversy about fuel pressure but I'm going to be to the point I suggest 14-20 PSI for optimal return flow for proper cooling and lubrication of the VP44. Fuel Filtration With the all the different fuel pump and fuel systems out there. I've been quite pleased with my Airdog fuel system. I've got a pre-filter and water separator before the pump then the 3-micron filter after the Air Dog pump. Then I kept the stock filter as well and dropped a 10-micron Fleetguard filter in place. This has worked flawlessly on polishing fuel for the Bosch VP44 Injection Pump. Also being the AirDog flows a majority back to the fuel tank it tends to continually polish the fuel in the tank. I always will suggest in purchasing fuel from a high volume station like truck stops. Fuel Lubricity Bosch back in the day when designing the Bosch VP44 injection pump they based the design off of Europian fuel standards of 460 HFRR or less. Just about the time the Bosch VP44 was being introduced to the Cummins engine the US fuel was not adhering to any standards. So even before ULSD (ultra low sulfur diesel) came to be the US fuel had numbers as high as 500-600 HFRR. After a whole diesel industry getting damaged by the fuel the US standard was made at 520 HFRR. But that not going to meet the Bosch standards of <450 HFRR. So hence, the 2 cycle oil concept was born to band-aid this issue. Clean DC Power There have been so many years where people made claims of the electronics in the Bosch VP44 failed because of heat cycles. Well, that might have been true. Never the less there is another killer that I've uncovered is how clean is your power? Batteries are clean DC power just as they are but when you hook an alternator to the batteries there is always going to be some sort of ripple from AC waveform being converted to DC power. As alternators age the diodes start to fail and more and more AC power starts to leak out. I've set the limit at no higher than 0.1 AC volts measured at the batteries. The whole AC power problem could create these codes. P0215 P0251 P0252 P0253 P0254 P1688 P1689
  6. Bosch VP44 Injection Pump Overflow Valve Overflow Valve Description The overflow valve is located on the side of the Bosch VP44 injection pump. It is also used to connect the fuel return line (banjo fitting) to the Bosch VP44 injection pump for your Cummins powered Dodge truck. Overflow Valve Operation Fuel volume from the fuel transfer (lift) pump will always provide more fuel than the fuel injection pump requires. The overflow valve (a check valve) is used to route excess fuel through the fuel return line and back to the fuel tank. Approximately 70% of supplied fuel is returned to the fuel tank. The valve opens at approximately 97 kPa (14 psi). If the check valve within the assembly is sticking open, fuel drainage of the Bosch VP44 injection pump could cause hard starting. If a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) has been stored for “P0168 decreased engine performance due to high injection pump fuel temperature”, the overflow valve may be stuck in closed position. Overflow Valve Diagnosis And Testing A rubber tipped blow gun with regulated air line pressure is needed for this test. 1. Clean area around overflow valve and fuel return line at Bosch VP44 injection pump before removal. 2. Remove overflow valve from Bosch VP44 injection pump and banjo fitting. 3. Discard old sealing gaskets. 4. Set regulated air pressure to approximately 97kPa (14–16 psi). 5. Using blow gun, apply pressure to overflow valve inlet end ( the end that goes into Bosch VP44 injection pump). 6. The internal check valve should release, and air should pass through overflow valve at 97 kPa (14–16 psi). If not, replace overflow valve. 7. Reduce regulated air pressure to 10 psi and observe overflow valve. Overflow valve should stay shut. If not, replace overflow valve. 8. Install new sealing gaskets to overflow valve. 9. Install overflow valve through banjo fitting and into Bosch VP44 injection pump. 10. Tighten to 30 N·m (24 ft. lbs.) torque. Overflow Valve Removal The overflow valve (pressure relief valve) is located at the outside of fuel injection pump. It connects the fuel return line (banjo fitting) to the pump. The overflow valve has no internally serviceable parts and must be replaced as an assembly. Two sealing gaskets are used. One gasket is located between pump and banjo fitting. The other is located between the banjo fitting and end of the valve. 1. Clean area around overflow valve and fuel return line at injection pump before removal. 2. Remove valve from pump and banjo fitting. 3. Discard old sealing gaskets. Overflow Valve Installation The overflow valve (pressure relief valve) is located at the outside of fuel injection pump. It connects the fuel return line (banjo fitting) to the pump. The valve has no internally serviceable parts and must be replaced as an assembly. Two sealing gaskets are used. One gasket is located between pump and banjo fitting. The other is located between the banjo fitting and end of the valve. 1. Install new sealing gaskets to valve. 2. Install valve through banjo fitting and into the pump. 3. Tighten to 30 N·m (24 ft. lbs.) torque. Few notes... Here is a close up of the bleed hole in the overflow valve. This picture is magnified X10 so you can even see the tiny hole used to bleed air from the system. There is a lot of controversy about the operation of the overflow valve on a Bosch VP44 injection pump Cummins selected. From my personal opinion that the overflow valve is the last check valve to hold the pressure up to 14 PSI for the injection pump. As for the bleed hole in the side that hole is so small, it can't possibly create enough flow to aid in cooling the Bosch VP44 injection pump unless the overflow valve is opened which listed above requires 14 PSI to be open.
  7. Bosch VP44 injection pumps key part numbers key# Cummins# 026 - 3944021 027 - 3944022 028 - 3944023 029 - 3944024 030 - 3944025 031 - 3944026 032 - 3944027 033 - 3944028 034 - 3944029 035 - 3944030 036 - 3944031 037 - 3944032 038 - 3944033 039 - 3944034 040 - 3944035 041 - 3944036 042 - 3944037 043 - 3944038 044 - 3944039 045 - 3944040 046 - 3944041
  8. Fuel Pressure Specification For Bosch VP44 Injection Pumps Here is a copy of the fuel system specifications from the Dodge Factory Service Manual. This is for your Dodge Cummins Turbo diesel truck with a Bosch VP44 injection pump. Fuel pressure Normal fuel pressure should float about 14-15 PSI running down the pavement. It should never fall below 10 PSI at all. Here is a colorize fuel pressure gauge to give you a clue of the fuel pressure span you want. You want the needle to stay in the green at all times. Yellow zone is a warning that you should check the fuel filter, lift pump performance, overflow valve, etc. This is undocumented maximum pressure is 20 PSI. Now take notice to the overflow valve is set for 14 PSI so excessive pumping of fuel does nothing for performance except create more heat in the fuel, which in turns reduces the cooling ability of the fuel and adds more stress to the lift pump. So a little extra fuel pressure is a good thing because it ensures the Bosch VP44 injection pump stays cooled and lubricated properly. However, excessive fuel pressure will heat the fuel and reduced the cooling ability of the fuel. Now always remember that the only lubrication the Bosch VP44 injection pump will see is the fuel itself so if you don't have enough fuel pressure it will cause damage to the Bosch VP44 injection pump. It's like the same as running the engine with low oil pressure it will continue to run, but the damage to the engine will occur. On the other hand, the Bosch VP44 injection pumps, which happen to be about $1,200 to replace. Pressure Drop The amount of fuel pressure drop between idle and wide-open throttle. 2-3 PSI drop from idle to WOT is normal. However, 5 PSI or more pressure drop from idle to WOT is pointing out a failed lift pump, plugged filter, and/or plumbing restrictions. 2-3 PSI Is Normal Dropping more than 5 PSI is pointing towards a failed lift pump, plugged filter, or restrictive plumbing. Just to show you the difference in the stock plumbing which is 6mm ID plumbing and most performance pumps come with 1/2" ID plumbing. These pictures will give you an idea... The first picture is a Big Line fitting over the top of the stock plumbing. Then the second picture compares the stock 6mm ID steel lines to a 1/2" ID Big Line hose. The best way to show this example of restrictions is to let's say your house is on fire. You know your garden hose has 80 PSI of pressure, but the garden hose is only 5/8" ID hose. Your wife calls 911 and gets the fire department coming in the meantime you keep fighting the fire with your little 5/8" garden hose and losing the battle. The fire department shows up and pulls a 2 1/2" hose off the truck and charges it at 80 PSI and now winning the battle. Your fire is put out! What is so different? No matter what the size of the fuel line will dictate how much volume can be pushed through the fuel line. Like the story above the water pressure was the same at 80 PSI, but the hose size jumped from 5/8" to 2 1/2" ID hose and the volume changes are the size of hose. So the same thing applies to the stock fuel system. The stock banjo bolts and 6mm ID pipes are just too restrictive and cannot supply enough volume of fuel for that Bosch VP44 injection pump demands. This why I highly suggest you go up to 1/2" ID plumbing. Reasons Why Fuel Pressure Is Critical Let's take a look at a Bosch VP44 injection pump. I've labeled the fuel lines supplying fuel and return line plus the overflow valve. Now I know there is a ton of rumors on the internet of all kinds of minimum pressures for a Bosch VP44 injection pump. I'm going to say stick with the Dodge Factory Service Manual Specifications for fuel pressure. Now let's talk a bit more about the flow of the fuel. The lift pump supplies pressurized fuel to the Bosch VP44 injection pump the overflow valve regulates how much fuel pressure is held. Excessive fuel pressure is returned to the fuel tank. The picture below is of the bleed hole in the overflow valve this image was magnified x10 to show you how small the bleed hole really is. Give you an idea the size of the hole use a single strand of 14 AWG copper wire, and it will NOT fit the hole. The bleed hole is there solely for bleeding air out of the system which air will pass through this tiny hole rather easy but fuel will not. However, if you're looking for long life from a Bosch VP44 injection pump, I would personally suggest you adjust your minimum pressure to 14 PSI this will ensure the overflow valve remain open and a constant fuel flow through the Bosch VP44 injection pump and keep it cool all the time. Let me play out a simple scenario. Let's say my fuel pressure is roughly 10-11 PSI. I'm going to drive up into the back country approximately 40 miles with my Dodge Cummins towing an 8x8 utility trailer. Now the whole trip heading uphill into the mountain towing an empty trailer is going to be enough fuel flowing to the injectors to keep the Bosch VP44 injection pump happy. However, I've spent the day and loaded up with firewood and now coming back down the mountain loaded. I'm using my exhaust brake and coasting most of the way down taking it slow and easy. At this point, the injectors are no longer firing so the Bosch VP44 injection pump is not pumping fuel out to the injectors. Furthermore, the overflow valve closes at about 10-11 PSI so let's say it did close. Now where is the fuel going??? Nowhere! It is pooled up in the injection pump and gaining heat and being broke down. You've also removed the cooling and lubricating of the Bosch VP44 injection pump so now it actually taking on damage. To give you a feel for the fuel flow coming from the injection pump with an AirDog 150 at 17.5 PSI of fuel pressure, I've got a video to explain that quickly. I've heard rumors of some people trying to develop a cool down system for the Bosch VP44 Injection pump but after making the video above, there is just no way to cool down the injection pump using the lift pump of even the AirDog/FASS series. The whole problem is the restrictions inside the Bosch VP44 injection pump and the overflow valve as seen in the video above. So the only way to keep the Bosch VP44 injection pump cool is to keep fuel flowing through it at all times. So to keep the overflow valve open I suggest the 14 PSI minimum pressure. I'm currently at 136K miles on my Bosch VP44 injection pump and still going strong using a 16 PSI minimum pressure and an 18 PSI idle pressure. Here is a short video of stable fuel pressure from 55 MPH to 70 MPH at WOT. Here is another video done with idling, cruising, and WOT operation. Yes. I got a bit carried away and sloshed the fuel in the tank and sucked an air bubble and the pressure fell off. Cranking Pressure Test Here is a simple test on how to do the test for cranking fuel pressure. Pull the fuel pump relay in the PDC and then attempt to start the engine. Pay attention to the fuel pressure gauge during cranking. Be aware this test will trip a P1689 code and light the CHECK ENGINE light. Excessive cranking pressure can lead to difficult starting problems. Suggested Lift Pump Replacement You should replace the stock fuel system completely since it cannot supply enough fuel for even stock requirements without causing damage to the Bosch VP44 injection pump or adding stress to the lift pump. The pumps I suggest are proven and come with a lifetime warranty. These pumps come with a full kit and replace everything from the fuel tank to Bosch VP44 injection pump. AirDog 100, 150, or 165 Raptor 100 or 150 FASS 100 or 150 FASS DDRP (DDRP Ver.2 - 89 GPH) I don't suggest these pumps... Because they don't address the pump location, plumbing restrictions, or come with much of warranty. Stock Carter or Carter Campaign Pump (4090046) Holley Blue or Holley Black FASS DDRP (DDRP Ver.1 - 40 GPH) AirTex Mopar's Notes: That was true for the DDRP Ver.1 However, DDRP-02 is rated at 89 GPH and will hold pressure. It is listed as a Stock replacement pump designed to perform better than the Stock pump, but not for Chips that add fueling. I place a Power Puck on my truck with the DDRP-02 and saw no difference in FP at either idle or WOT, (PP is a timing chip doesn't change the amount of fuel). That said the PP is currently removed from my truck as I overpowered my clutch both loaded and unloaded, back to the stock clutch is fine. Looking for a Valair possible DD organic, or SD Kevlar/Ceramic. It is currently in the stock location and giving 15 psi at idle and 10 at WOT. Information Provided By: rhagfo http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/98-5-02-powertrain/404412-fass-ddrp-02-a.html#post4197714 Additional Information (About Performance Crowds & Fuel Pressure) I've seen several times where people will link back to performance pump builders and quoting where they say, "(Un-named) proved that 5 PSI, under load, made all the horsepower the VP44 pump could make, even with stock fuel lines, fittings and supply pump." This might be true but there is nothing ever said about the life span of the pump at these conditions. So... Please do not follow these performance crowds into destroying a perfectly good Bosch VP44 injection pump. The fact still remains from Bosch the actual designer of the Bosch VP44 injection pump states that injection pump should return 70% of the fuel back to the fuel tank for cooling and lubrication purpose of the VP44. Being the only way a Bosch VP44 injection pump can do this is to have fuel pressure above 14 PSI to open the overflow valve. Then if the stock Bosch VP44 injection pump with an enhancement box say an Edge Comp on 5x5 can consume 15-20 GPH that means the stock 35 GPH pump cannot keep up with Bosch's design of 70% return volume. So this why products like AirDog, Raptor and FASS was created because they actually meet the demands of the Bosch VP44 injection pump. Then another fact that Bosch will let you know of is that diaphragm damage occurs from operating the Bosch VP44 injection pump at low fuel pressures. Making matters worse is that no Bosch injection re-builder will void warranty a VP44 injection pump with diaphragm damage. Dead give away that you had a bad lift pump or low fuel pressure problems. Please view the Bosch VP44 exploded view page to see there is no diaphragm in the Revision 027 Bosch VP44 Injection Pump Then the other fact is right from the Dodge Factory Service Manual has the minimum fuel pressures (picture at the top of the page). It even states the pressure that the overflow valve requires to open. Refer to the Overflow Valve Testing from the Dodge Factory Service Manual and see that the overflow valve should remain closed at 10 PSI and open by 14 PSI. So if the overflow valve is close by 10 PSI, then you extra cooling and lubrication just disappeared. So ultimately it suggested having a fuel system of no less than 100 GPH supply that can maintain a minimum pressure of 14-15 PSI at WOT. This will great extend the life of the VP44 because it keeps the electronics cooler longer and keeps the rotating parts lubricated properly. So please people let the facts and information from the actual designers of the injection pump (Bosch) and engine (Cummins) provide you proper information for your fuel system for your engine. Don't be swayed by performance shops claim of high horse output with little fuel pressure. As I proved right here doesn't work for the longevity of the VP44 injection pump... Another thing to bring up there are people that are increasing fuel pressures above 20 PSI. Please don't do this. The return port leaving the VP44 pump isn't very big at all. The return port is on the left and supply is on the right. As you can see increasing fuel pressures above 20 PSI put you at risk for shaft seal failure. Increasing the pressure above 20 PSI isn't going to improve the return flow. I say stick with the 14-20 PSI pressure range for seal safety. Additional Information (About Maximum Flow Rates) Here are some calculated flow abilities of the stock fuel system vs. 1/2" big line kits. This is not calculating bend, turns, offices just straight flow for open end plumbing and this is a rough calculation. Pipe Size Gallon Per Hour Flow Rate Gallon Per Minute Flow Rate 6mm ID pipe 75 GPH @ 15 PSI 1.2 GPM @ 15 PSI 1/2" ID pipe 570 GPH @ 15 PSI 9.5 GPM @ 15 PSI Use The banjo bolt Shrader valve to test for fuel pressure, Item 3 in the above diagram. If you have a 98-99 truck the port might be on top of the fuel filter housing. You can see the 90* bend fitting coming out of the top of the fuel filter housing in the below picture. Install a Shrader valve and test from there. I'm hearing of tales of shops, mechanics, or dealers doing the old hook up the fuel pressure gauge and only checking fuel pressure at idle. This is wrong. Because I've seen lots of cases where fuel line restriction, fuel filter plugging, gelling fuel and other thing causing fuel pressure to drop out under load. Like this video from a friend of mine, you'll see he's got awesome fuel pressure at an idle (where most shops gave him the green light). However, what the shops did not test for is WOT at highway speed, and you'll see in the video, he can pull way down to 0 PSI. Anything under 14 PSI is a concern... Anything under 10 PSI is a serious problem. As for having a gauge in the cab all Dodge Cummins trucks should have a fuel pressure gauge in the cab. Because like you seen bench testing with an idle pressure is meaningless if you can't see the WOT pressure at highway speed. View full Cummins article
  9. So the other day my truck would not start. When I turned on the key, the WTS light did not come on, then it would crank and crank and not fire. I opened three injector lines, but no fuel was coming out of them as I cranked. I finally used some starting fluid to get it running. Two of the lines still did not have any fuel coming out of them and the truck was running rough. I closed all the lines, reved the engine up and it finally started firing on all six. I was able to drive it, even shut it off and restart it, but then a few days later when I tried to start it it would just crank with not fire. I checked the voltage going into the VP44 and I do have voltage in what I think is the correct pin. I am not getting any error codes, but am wondering if it might be the injection pump that is bad and not the electronics? the reason for this is the fact that when I opened the fuel lines, even when running two of the lines did not have fuel squirting out of them. Any thoughts of other things to check on before I replace the injection pump. Also, I have taken out the auto trans and replaced it with a 5 speed, do I still need to use the S.O. injection pump? I am not sure if I will gain anything as I do have 75 hp injectors, so it may be just as simple to stay with what I have?
  10. Was looking through Fuel pump options and came across this place. industrialinjection.com They rebuild fuel injection pumps for diesel engines and tout their abilities, as do all companies, however, may be something to it... http://www.industrialinjection.com/shop/category/pumps/dodge-injection-pumps/ Curious if anyone knows of these guys or not, interested about experiences.
  11. 99,6XX miles and the injection pump is failing, again. I ordered the new vp today. I need a fuel pressure gauge because the air dog light must not be completely functional. Am looking at a juice attitude cts, thoughts? Why not get the power as well as monitoring is my thoughts. Occasionally I run red, good or bad idea? Do I need a fuel additive? What would you guys do to my truck to help with A) fuel problems and B) mileage? Can't keep dropping $1000 every couple years on a vp. Air dog has stock 15lb spring, should I change to 17lb? Keep in mind I do have emissions here in Denver.
  12. Does anyone know wher you can find a list of bosch certified vp44 rebuilders? just curiosity.
  13. Made a quick trip to the store and on the way back while slowing to make a right hander the Cummins Died . I coasted to the curb. Could'nt see anything wrong. drain a little fuel for Airdog 150 at water filter too see whats up there, looked ok. WALKED a block and a half to get tools, (I Know:lmao:). Remove Fuel PSI sender and add another gauge and was reading 17 before cranking, just the bump of the started so there is psi to injector pump. Then I called Tow Truck:banghead:. Too heavy for me to push that far. After I got home started reading about this, Ck code and found nothing. Now I ask should i ck the keyway at pump or what next? Any advise would be very helpful.--- Update to the previous post...Let me add that the truck sat around for about a month or so, then when i started to drive it again, I would have to crank it a lot longer to get it started. Before i would really just bump the started a little and it would start right up. And I do run 2 stroke at 200:1.Just thinking again, what about the dowel pin falling out. would it leave a code of something or not?
  14. VP-44 Key Picture On my wifes truck I wanted to verifiy the key was... 1. In 2. The arrow pointed the right way 3. That the number matched the number on the pump I was able to use a 4MP Cannon camera on the closeup setting to capture this picture so we didnt have to use a mirror or scope. If you didn't know... the arrow points towards the pump. the number on the key matches the number stamped on the pump. You can't use another number key
  15. I just had the VP44 and the lift pump on my 98.5 Dodge replaced. At idle, the engine surges from 600 to 800 rpm and wants to die when the accelerator is pressed. The injectors have been bled once, the pump has been primed with the key trick once or twice and I am not sure if the APPS reset has been done. A friend is doing the actual work, he is a heavy equipment diesel mechanic and has never worked on a Dodge. I do trust his work mechanically. Am I right in thinking we need to reset the APPS, prime it a half dozen times and bleed it one more time?It's kind of funny, I have been reading on here for several years now and never had a reason to post. My old 92 12V just never broke down and I'm not smart enough to give a competent answer about these 24V's. I've been in deep do... every since my wife decided I needed a better truck and bought this piece of junk without talking to me. I would appreciate any suggestions you have. I do believe we're on the right track.:pray:There are no codes showing now that the pump has been replaced.Russ is probably the only one who remembers Tudor the Turtle.
  16. New Blue Chip X, Marine Injectors and a valve adjustment, with a new filter thrown in for good measure:cool:
  17. Ok here's the scoop, About a couple weeks ago my 98' 24 valve started stumbling and cutting out, now today she just up and died. It was as if I reached down and turned the key off. Brought it to a garage and he pulled up the following codes: P1688, P0237, P1693, & P1388. I have no clue what's goin on with it, getting married in 18 days and didn't need this :ahhh:Any ideas??Lucky
  18. First of all, Thanks to Michael for taking the time today to help me out, I just started working on troubleshooting the harness to see if its the problem
  19. Can the main computer shut down the Bosch VP44 if there is a cooling problem or temp sensor error? I have been having cooling problems on hot days and under load. After flushing radiator, the engine ran normally for 5 minutes down the freeway and then suddenly stopped and wouldn't start. (as if it ran out of fuel) . Fuel pressure from lift pump is OK. Fuel to the injection pump inlet OK but nothing at the injectors. There was no missing, no smoke, no roughness, good 23 mpg, just before shutdown. Coolant temp was normal. It seems odd that the VP44 would fail after I was working on the coolant system. Is there an internal fuel shutoff solenoid inside the VP44? Any insight would be appreciated!
  20. See attached file. I'm trying to figure out the path of the fuel flow within the VP44 injection pump (IP). I'm interested in the slight possibility of additional cooling for the IP. Does anyone have any other pics or drawings or diagrams they can upload? I've done a bit of research on forums and I've talked to BlueChip at lengths. The VP44's computer sits on top of a heatsink or is integral to it, this is bolted to the IP housing, and the diesel fuel passing under the heatsink cools the computer. There is a vane pump at the inlet of the VP44. The "ww.chinahanji.com" drawing is helpful. I'm thinking the area directly beneath the computer, adjacent to the inlet and outlet ports is a cavity and inlet to the vane pump. The fuel enters the cavity thru the inlet port, the cavity is pressurized to 14 psi via overflow valve (or pressure release/check valve, whatever you want to call it) that is integral to outlet banjo bolt. A portion of the fuel is taken from the cavity by the vane pump and fed to the high pressure rotary section of the IP, the rest is returned to the tank thru the overflow valve. This flow of fuel, most of which is returned to the tank is what cools the computer. Does anyone know what the bottom the computer/heatsink looks like?- is it finned or flat? The smaller cavity that the heatsink/computer also covers is shown with what looks like a wire ribbon passing thru and has a seperate gasket. Does anyone know if this is also filled with fuel? Please, are there any VP44 guru's out there that can correct me? VP44 pics1.doc
  21. What's the difference between a truck vp and a midrange vp? can we use the midrange pump on our trucks??:confused:
  22. Where can I order a pump at a reasonable cost 2001 V44:ahh:
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